AgriInfo.in
AgronomyHorticultureBotanySoil SciencePlant PathologyEntomologyExtentionAgril. EngineeringDairy ScienceEconomics
 
categories
 
» Water Management Including Micro Irrigation
» Principles of Agronomy
» Agricultural Meteorology
» Rainfed Agriculture
» Farming Systems & Sustainable Agriculture
» Practicals on Weed Managemet
» Crop Production - Rabi Season
» Weed Management
agriculture information

Current Category » Farming Systems & Sustainable Agriculture

Components of Social Forestry System

i) Farm forestry

ii) Community Forestry and

iii) Rehabilitation of Degraded Land.

i) In Farm forestry tree plantation and management is purely on private lands.

ii) In community forestry, afforestation is practiced in the lands outside the conventional forest area for the benefit of the local population. This is practiced on community lands outside the conventional forest area for the benefit of the local population. This is practiced on community lands, village Panchayat lands and government wastelands and managed by the community

iii) In to meet the fuel wood and fodder requirement of local population. Rehabilitation of degraded forests is usually managed by the forest department.

These forest supply fuel fodder fuel, fodder and small timber for rural housing and for the use in agricultural implements. This is a new dimension recently added to the concept to forestry, which include the following types.

i) Farm Forestry:

Tree plantation and management is purely on private lands. raising the forest on the farm in rows of trees on bunds or boundaries of field or on farm and individual trees in private agricultural lands as well as creation of breaks which are protective vegetal serene created round a farm or on orchard by raising one or two rows of trees vary close shrubs in between.

ii) Extension Forestry:

It is pratise of forestry in areas form where the vegetation or the forest has vanished with an object of increasing the area under tree growth. This include following plantations.

a) Mixed Forestry:

practice of raising fodder in areas grass inter plated with fodder trees, fruit frees and a fuel wood tree on suitable wastelands, Panchayat lands and a village common place is termed as mixed forestry.

b) Shelter Belts:

It is belt of trees and or shrubs maintained for the purpose of shelter from wind, sun, snow etc. shelter belts are more extensive than the wind breaks place is termed as mixed forestry.
iii) Linear strip plantation: This plantation is done on the sides of public roads, tanals, and railway trackside with fast growing trees.

The national commission on Agriculture ( NCA, 1976) recommended the programme of raising trees, grasses and fodder in the farmers own land, village commons, wastelands and degraded forests to meet – fuel wood, fodder, small timber for small housing and thorns for fencing.

The programme of ‘Van Mahostav’ was proposed to motivate the farmers to take up tree planting with the creation of a National Waste Land Development Board ( NWDD) during 1985 and special emphasis was given on social forestry.

The social forestry programme are strengthened with aid from different international donor agencies viz. World Bank, Swedish International Development Agencies ( SIDA) , United States Agency for International development ( USAID) and Canadian International Development Agency ( CIDA).

Current Category » Farming Systems & Sustainable Agriculture