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Current Category » Introduction to Horticulture

Scope of Horticulture

There is a great scope of Horticulture. Horticulture production is less as compared and hence very high demand in market.

Present Status:

Horticultural crops constitute a significant component of total agricultural production of the country. These crops cover nearly 11.6 million ha area with a total production of over 91 million tones.

Area and Production of Horticultural Crops (1984 - 85):

Sr. No.

Crop

Area
(Million ha)

% of total
Area

Production
(Million
tones)

% of total
production

1.

Fruits

2.54

21.93

23.76

26.00

2.

Vegetables

4.50

38.86

41.20

48.37

3.

Tuber crops

1.30

11.22

16.68

18.36

4.

Plantation crops

2.88

24.88

5.96

6.53

5.

Spices

0.36

3.10

0.77

0.84

 

Total

11.58

88.37

 

 

Includes tea, coffee, rubber (The Hindu, Survey of Indian Agriculture 1988)

Though these crops cover only 6.7 per cent of the gross crop area, they contribute nearly 18.84 per cent of the gross value of agriculture output. In 1984 - 85 by exporting Agricultural produce to other countries we earned Rs. 2960 crores, and of these horticultural crops accounted for Rs. 1546 crores (52 percent). Horticultural crops contribution to the national income as per the data of Central Statistical Organization (1986) was improved from 15.91 per cent in 1970 - 71 to 18.84 per cent in 1984 - 85.

1. Increasing Investigation Facilities:

The agricultural sectors getting priority in the new five year plan outlay. There is definitely positive factor in keeping hope for bringing area under irrigation, Many irrigation projects, major and minor are in progress and many would be undertaken in near future. Number of percolation tanks is being constructed and new schemes.

2. Area Under Rain Fed:

Horticultural crops are not required the perennial irrigation.

3. Transport and Marketing Facilities:

It is obvious that horticultural produce is perishable and mostly consumed as fresh and need quick disposal after harvest.

4. Cold Storage Facilities and Preservation:

During peak period of a particular crop there is glut in market and prices realized are very low. This can be overcome by storing the fruits in cold storage. Many preserved products have export potential e.g. Jam, Jelly, Juices syrups etc.

5. New Techniques for Maximization of Production:

This helps in increasing the yield.
i) Use of Growth regulator and gurdling increasing yield by 50% in grapes.

ii) Use of growth regulators.

6. Availability of Cheap Labour:

 In India because of large population man power is easily available and as compared to other countries the labour is cheap which definitely help in keeping down the production cost.
 
7. Loan Facilities:

Many Commercial Banks and Government provide loans at low interest for the promotion of Horticultural Industry.
 
8. Sloppy, undulated land can be brought under cultivation by growing rain fed horticultural crops.

9. The average production of the Horticultural crops is more than the agronomic crops and therefore, the net returns are also more.

Current Category » Introduction to Horticulture