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Current Category » Introduction to Soil Science

Measuring Soil Moisture

Two general types of measurements relating to soil water are ordinarily used
i) By some methods the moisture content is measured directly or indirectly
ii) Techniques are used to determine the soil moisture potential (tension or suction)

Measuring soil moisture content in laboratory

1. Gravimetric method: This consists of obtaining a moist sample, drying it in an oven at 105°C until it losses no more weight and then determining the percentage of moisture. The gravimetric method is time consuming and involves laborious processes of sampling, weighing and drying in laboratory.

2. Electrical conductivity method: This method is based upon the changes in electrical conductivity with changes in soil moisture. Gypsum blocks inside of with two electrodes at a definite distance are apart used in this method. These blocks require previous calibration for uniformity. The blocks are buried in the soil at desired depths and the conductivity across the electrodes measured with a modified Wheatstone bridge. These electrical measurements are affected by salt concentration in the soil solution and are not very helpful in soils with high salt contents.
Measuring soil moisture potential in situ (field)
 
3. Suction method or equilibrium tension method: Field tensiometers measure the tension with which water is held in the soils. They are used in determining the need for irrigation. The tensiometer is a porous cup attached to a glass tube, which is connected to a mercury monometer. The tube and cup are filled with water and cup inserted in the soil. The water flows through the porous cup into the soil until equilibrium is established. These tension readings in monometer, expressed in terms of cm or atmosphere, measures the tension or suction of the soil.

If the soil is dry, water moves through the porous cup, setting up a negative tension (or greater is the suction). The tensiometers are more useful in sandy soils than in fine textured soils. Once the air gets entrapped in the tensiometer, the reliability of readings is questionable.

Current Category » Introduction to Soil Science