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Current Category » Rural Sociology and Educational Psychology

Importance of Culture for an Individual and the Group

Culture forms an important element of social life of a man. It is the culture that makes human animal to man. It regulates his conduct and prepares him for group life. It teaches him what type of food he should take and what manners, how he should cover himself and behave with the fellows, how he should speak and influence the people, how he should co-operative and compete with other. Man has acquired these qualities required to live and social behavior even for complicated situations.

There would not have been group life without culture. Culture regulates the behavior of the people and satisfies their primary drives i.e. hunger, shelter and sex, which enable him to maintain group life. People behave the way of society. Culture has provided a number of checks upon irrationally or irresponsibly. It has kept social relationship intact.

Culture has given new vision to the individual by providing him a set of rules of co-operation. Culture teaches him to think of himself as a part of large whole. It provides him with the concept of family, state, nation, class and makes possible the co-ordination and division of labors. Culture also creates new needs and drives for example thirst for knowledge and arranges for their satisfaction. It satisfies the aesthetic, moral and religious interest of members of group.

In brief, the culture gives the individuals or groups the feelings of unity with the group. It enables them to live and work together without too much confusion and mutual interference.

Current Category » Rural Sociology and Educational Psychology